Printed from ChabadNZ.org

FAQ

FAQ

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 B"H

Please Note: Since the main Chabad House (located in Christchurch) has been severely damaged by the Feburary earthquake. Chabad is now based on the North Island. We can be reached at 021818770 - Rabbi@ChabadNZ.org

UPDATE: During the summer there are two Chabad Houses open on the South Island. There is a Chabad House in Auckland open year round. For more info please contact us.

1) Q. Where do the Jewish people live in New Zealand?

   A. Although there are Jewish people living sporadically throughout the Country, "Auckland" and "Wellington" are believed to have the biggest concentration of Jewish people.

Here is a  list of places in the order of how many Jewish people are believed to live there:

Auckland

Wellington

Nelson 

Christchurch

Dunedin

Hamilton

Queenstown 

Hastings

Palmerston north

[Note: During the general summer season, there are many thousands of Jewish (Mostly Israeli) tourists who spend an average of three months traveling throughout the Country]

2) Q. Where can I find an Orthodox Minyan in the Country?

  A. There are only two Active Orthodox Shuls that have weekly Shabbat minyanim in all of the Country, both of which are on the North Island;

 1) The Auckland Hebrew Congregation

The Auckland Shtibel (a satalite Minyan of the AHC) currently housed in the Ray Freedman Library building.

 The Wellington Hebrew Congregation

 

Christchurch - Canterbury 

There used to be regular weekly orthodox Minyanim on the South Island (in Christchurch) before the 2010 earthquakes, these services were lead most recently by our Shliach at the time, Rabbi Shmulik Friedman and his predecessor Rabbi Mendy Goldstein. Unfortunately since the earthquakes, there are no more regular weekly Minyanim in Christchurch or anywhere else on the South Island.

 

3) Q. Where can I get Kosher food? 

  A. Thanks to the "Kosher Kiwi Directory" (an online guide and list of Kosher food products) shopping for Kosher food in New Zealand is easier.

  At present, Supplies of Kosher meat and poultry are very limited in the Country, and available only from the Shul shops of Auckland and Wellington.

 

4) Q. How many Jews live in New Zealand?

  A. There is no clarity on this issue. Some have put the total figure as low as 7,000.

One should note that, in addition to the official figures, there are thousands of second generation Holocaust survivors who have integrated, assimilated and intermarried over the decades. We have met numerous individuals who were unaware that they were in fact Jewish. 

           North Island: 6,000~

Auckland Estimated 4,000~

Wellington: Estimated 2,000~

 

           South Island: Over 1,500~

Christchurch region: The census bureau has put the number at approx 600 (prior to the earthquakes).

While we were based in CHCH, we have been in contact with Jewish people from virtually every City in the South Island, the main Cities with some form of organised communities are Dunedin and Nelson.

Queenstown is a tiny City, but has the highest percentage of Jews p/c of all Cities in the Country. (We have discovered this over the past few years on our temporary functions in the City). 

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5) Q. When did Chabad first come to New Zealand?

A.

Since the 1960s - Chabad has sent many "visiting Rabbis" throughout the country, in order to reach out to families and individuals, in an effort to help them with their Yiddishkeit. Amongst the first Chabad Rabbis who visited, were the legendary Rabbis Yitzchok Groner OBM, a leading pioneer of Judaism in Australia and ylch"t Rabbi Biyomin Klein Shlit"a, Mazkir of the Rebbe.

Between the late 70s and the late 90s New Zealand has had 3 Chabad Rabbis and their families who lived in Wellington and Auckland and dedicated themselves during their years in NZ to serving the communities and the unaffiliated.

We will be adding more FAQs in the future be"h.

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